Here’s some law for you, if this isn’t enough I’ve got another 100 cases

To conduct an investigatory stop, the officer must have reasonable suspicion that the person “`has committed, is committing, or is about to commit a crime.'” M.M. v. State, 72 So.3d 328, 330 (Fla. 4th DCA 2011) (quoting Fuentes v. State, 24 So.3d 1231, 1234 (Fla. 4th DCA 2009)). Whether an officer has reasonable suspicion for a stop depends on the totality of the circumstances, interpreted in consideration of the officer’s knowledge and experience. See Ippolito v. State, 789 So.2d 423, 425 (Fla. 4th DCA 2001).

M.M. v. State, 72 So.3d 328, 330 (Fla. 4th DCA 2011) (quoting Fuentes v. State, 24 So.3d 1231To determine whether an officer had reasonable suspicion for an investigatory stop, we look at the totality of circumstances. Id. Law enforcement must be able to articulate a well-founded suspicion of criminal activity in light of the officer’s training and experience. Popple v. State, 626 So.2d 185, 186 (Fla.1993). “Mere suspicion is not enough.” Id.
When an anonymous tip prompts a police investigation, it will justify a stop as
[ 72 So.3d 331 ]

long as it can be corroborated. Fuentes, 24 So.3d at 1235. This requires the officers to observe “`unlawful acts, unusual conduct, or suspicious behavior'” when they arrive on scene. See id. (quoting Baptiste v. State, 995 So.2d 285, 296 (Fla. 2008)). Here, that did not occur.

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